Publications

Books and Chapters

  • Williams-Reade, J. Introversion in Primary Care. In Connections in the Clinic: Relational Narratives from Primary Care. Reitz, R., Sudano, L, and Knudson, M. (Eds.) (09/2022)
  • Zubatsky, M. and Williams-Reade, J. Self-of-Therapist in Medical Settings, Springer. (10/2020)
  • Williams-Reade, J. Collaborating with Physicians. In Grauf-Grounds, C., Schermer Sellers, T., Edwards, S., Cheon, H., MacDonald, D. & Whitney, S. (Eds.) A Practice Beyond Cultural Humility: How clinicians can work more effectively in a diverse world. Routledge (09/2020)
  • Williams-Reade, J. and Trudeau, S. “Medical Family Therapy in Palliative and Hospice Care,” T. Mendenhall, A. Lamson, & J. Hodgson (Eds.), Clinical Methods in Medical Family Therapy. Springer. (12/2018)
  • Hodgson, J., Mendenhall, A., Lamson, A., Baird, M. & Williams-Reade, J. (2018). Innovations in MedFT: Pioneering New Frontiers! In Mendenhall, T., Lamson, A., Hodgson, J., & Baird, M. (Eds.), Clinical Methods in Medical Family Therapy. Springer. (04/2018)
  • Williams-Reade, J., Gordon, B.A., and Wray, W. “Program Evaluation for Medical Family Therapists” J. Hodgson, A. Lamson, T. Mendenhall, & R. Crane (Eds.), Medical family therapy: Advanced applications. Springer 2014. (04/2014)

Scholarly Journals--Accepted

  • Lamson, A., Hodgson, J., Pratt, K., Mendenhall, T. Wong, A., Sesemann, E., Brown, B., Taylor, E., Williams-Reade, J., Blocker, D., Harsh Caspari, J., Zubatsky, M., Martin, M., (2022). Couple and family interventions for high mortality health conditions: A strategic review (2010–2019), Journal of Marital and Family Therapy. (06/2022)

Book Review - Scholarly Journals--Published

  • Lamson, A., Hodgson, J., Pratt K. Brown, B. Taylor, E., Williams-Reade, J., Blocker, D. Wong, A. Harsh Caspari, J., Sesemann, E. Zubatsky, M. Mendenhall, T. & Martin, M. (2021). Families Share the Diagnosis, Not the Treatment: Couple and Family Interventions for High Mortality Health Conditions (2010-2019). Journal of Marital and Family Therapy (in press) (2021)
  • Williams-Reade J. (2013). Palliative and End of Life Care for Children and Young People: Home, Hospice, and Hospital. Families Systems & Health, 31(2), 230-231. (06/2013) (link)

Scholarly Journals--Published

  • Williams-Reade, J. Tapanes, D., Distelberg, B., & Montgomery, S. “Pediatric Chronic Illness Management: A Qualitative Dyadic Analysis of Adolescent Patient and Parent Illness Narratives.” Journal of Martial and Family Therapy, doi: 10.1111/jmft.12377 (01/2020)
  • Williams-Reade, J., *Lobo, E., & *Gutierrez, G. “Integrating Spirituality into MFT Training: A Reflexive Curriculum and Qualitative Evaluation.” Journal of Marital and Family Therapy doi: 10.1111/jmft.12314 (03/2018)
  • Distelberg, B.,Tapanes, D.,Emerson, ND., Brown, WN., Vaswani, D., Williams-Reade, J., Anspikian, A. & Montgomery, S. (2018). Prospective Pilot Study of the MEND Psychosocial Family Systems Program for Pediatric Chronic Illness. Family Process doi: 10.1111/famp.12288 (02/2018)
  • Distelberg B, Tapanes D, Emerson N D, Brown W N, Vaswani D, . . . Montgomery S. (2017). Prospective Pilot Study of the Mastering Each New Direction Psychosocial Family Systems Program for Pediatric Chronic Illness. Fam Process, , . Psychosocial interventions for pediatric chronic illness (CI) have been shown to support health management. Interventions that include a family systems approach offer potentially stronger and more sustainable improvements. This study explores the biopsychosocial benefits of a novel family systems psychosocial intervention (MEND: Mastering Each New Direction). Forty-five families participated in a 21-session intensive outpatient family systems-based program for pediatric CI. Within this single arm design, families were measured on five domains of Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQL) self-report measures; Stress, Cognitive Functioning, Mental Health, Child HRQL, Family Functioning. Both survey and biological measures (stress: catecholamine) were used in the study. Results from multivariate general linear models showed positive pre-, post-, and 3-month posteffects in all five domains. The program effects ranged from small to moderate (eta2 = .07-.64). The largest program effects were seen in the domains of cognitive functioning (eta2 = .64) and stress (eta2 = .27). Also, between disease groups, differences are noted and future implications for research and clinical practice are discussed. Conclusions suggest that the MEND program may be useful in helping families manage pediatric chronic illnesses. Study results also add to the growing body of literature suggesting that psychosocial interventions for pediatric chronic illness benefit from a family systems level of intervention. (03/2017) (link)
  • Freitas, C. J., Williams-Reade, J., Distelberg, B., Fox, C. A., & Lister, Z. (2016). Paternal Depression During Pregnancy and Postpartum: An International Delphi Study. Journal of Affective Disorders, 202, 128-136. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2016.05.056 (10/2016)
  • Emerson, N. D., Distelberg, B., Morell, E. R., Williams-Reade, J., Tapanes, D., & Montgomery, S. (2016). Quality of Life and School Absenteeism in Children with Chronic Illness. The Journal of School Nursing. pp.1-9, doi: 10.1177/1059840515615401. (10/2016)
  • Freitas C J, Williams-Reade J, Distelberg B, Fox C A, & Lister Z. (2016). Paternal depression during pregnancy and postpartum: An international Delphi study. , 202, 128-36. BACKGROUND: Fathers are at risk for depression during a mother's gestation and postpartum. Assessment, detection, and treatment are hampered by the lack of consensus on this issue. The purpose of this study was to reach expert consensus through the Delphi method on the defining factors of depression in peripartum fathers. METHODS: Purposive sampling resulted in the surveying of 14 international expert panelists. The study used a modified Delphi approach in which experts participated in two rounds of open-ended and scale questionnaires, followed by two rounds of opportunities to adjust their responses and/or comment on evolving data until consensus was achieved. RESULTS: Experts responded to 10 questions on terminology, diagnostics, symptomology, risk/protective factors, biological factors, assessment tools/protocol, cost implications, and key stakeholders. Of these 10 questions presented for discussion, the analysis resulted in 197 coded themes. Consensus was met for 119 of the 197 coded responses (60.41%). LIMITATIONS: Diversity of opinion within this Delphi Study was excluded for the sake of consensus. Regression to the mean may have occurred after continuous surveying and when evolving results were shared with panelists. Critics of Delphi methodologies have pointed to the issue of small expert samples typically used and the subjectivity of "expert." CONCLUSION: Consensus identified diagnostic criteria and symptomology that differentiates the paternal experience of peripartum depression. Experts indicated the importance of a father's social context, biological risk factors, limitations of current assessment tools, key stakeholders, and potential financial costs. Stakeholders on this issue would benefit from translating consensus into assessment and treatment. (09/2016) (link)
  • Distelberg B. J., Emerson N. D., Gavaza P., Tapanes D., Brown W. N., Shah H., Williams-Reade J. and Montgomery S. (2016). A Cost–Benefit Analysis of a Family Systems Intervention for Managing Pediatric Chronic Illness. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy42, 371–382. doi: 10.1111/jmft.12166 (08/2016)
  • Harvey, R., Brown, K., Miller, B., Williams-Reade, J., Tyndall, L. & Murphy, M. (2016). “Theory into Research Practice: Reflections and Recommendations on Collaborative Feminist Research.” Journal of Feminist Family Therapy 28(4); 136-158. doi: 10.1080/08952833.2016.1235410 (07/2016)
  • Harvey R, Brown K S, Miller B, Williams-Reade J, Tyndall L, & Murphy M. (2016). Theory into Research Practice: Reflections and Recommendations on Collaborative Feminist Research. Journal of Feminist Family Therapy, 28(4), 136-158. Six women faculty came together to research their peers asking other women in COAMFTE-accredited programs about their personal and professional identities. The goal of this research was to develop recommendations for the field of Couple/Marriage and Family Therapy to support the engagement and advancement of women faculty. The research collaboration itself became a heuristic, feminist praxis, a co-creation of insight, support network, and professional relationships which had liberating results for the collaborators. We intended to create a research project that would be collaborative, empowering, and transformative for participants; in the process, the collaboration became empowering and transformative for ourselves. This article will reflect on our experiences and provide recommendations for future feminist research teams. (2016) (link)
  • Haywood C Jr, Williams-Reade J, Rushton C, Beach M C, & Geller G. (2015). Improving Clinician Attitudes of Respect and Trust for Persons With Sickle Cell Disease. Hosp Pediatr, 5(7), 377-84. OBJECTIVE: To test the effect of 1 high-intensity, and 1 reduced-intensity, educational intervention designed to improve health care provider attitudes toward youth with sickle cell disease (SCD). METHODS: We exposed a regional sample of pediatric health care providers to a 2.5-day high-intensity educational and experiential intervention using videos about the SCD patient experience. Additionally, we traveled to a different set of regional health care institutions and offered pediatric providers a reduced-intensity intervention, consisting of a 90-minute lunchtime in-service centered on our same set of videos about the patient's experience. We assessed the impact of both interventions by taking pre/post measurements of the negative and positive attitudes expressed by participating providers toward patients with SCD. RESULTS: Both interventions tested elicited improvements in the SCD attitudes expressed by the pediatric providers as suggested through a reduction in measured negative attitude scores (20.0 vs 12.1, P < .001), and an improvement in positive attitude scores (67.1 vs 72.2, P < .001). Further testing suggested that the high-intensity intervention elicited a stronger effect than the reduced-intensity intervention across multiple attitudinal domains. CONCLUSIONS: Video-based interventions can be used to improve the attitudes of pediatric providers toward patients with SCD. The availability of interventions of varying intensities provides greater flexibility in designing efforts to advance the quality of SCD care through the improvement of provider attitudes. (07/2015) (link)
  • Haywood C Jr., Williams-Reade J, Rushton C, Beach MC, & Geller G. "Improving Clinician Attitudes of Respect and Trust for Persons with Sickle Cell Disease". Hospital Pediatrics.  Accepted February 2015 [in-press] (02/2015)
  • Tapanes, D., Distelberg, B., Williams-Reade, J., & Montgomery, S. Mastering Each New Direction (MEND):  Biopsychosocial Intervention for Pediatric Chronic Illness.” Journal of Family Psychotherapy (01/2015)
  • Tapanes Daniel, Distelberg Brian J, Williams-Reade Jackie, & Montgomery Susanne. (2015). Mastering Each New Direction (MEND): A Biopsychosocial Intervention for Pediatric Chronic Illness. Journal of Family Psychotherapy, 26(1), 3-8. The article presents the intensive outpatient psychosocial program known as Master Each New Direction (MEND). Topics discussed include its goal and target population, the conceptual framework grounded in the Biobehavioral Family Model (BBFM), its structure, its four principle-based phases of orientation, assessment, and language, introspection and congruence, meaning and expression of change, and mastery and maintenance, and a description of patient response to this family systems approach. (2015) (link)
  • Williams-Reade, J., Lawson, L.A., and Freitas, C. “Narrative-Informed Medical Family Therapy: Using Narrative Therapy Practices in Brief Medical Encounters.” Families, Systems, & Health, Vol 32(4), Dec 2014, 416-425. (12/2014) (link)
  • Distelberg, B., Williams-Reade, J., Tapanes, D., Montgomery, S. & Pandit, M. Evaluation of a Family Systems Approach to Managing Pediatric Chronic Illness: Managing Each New Direction (MEND). Family Process, 53(2):194-213. (04/2014)
  • Williams-Reade Jackie. (2014). "I've Never Thought of that Before": Using Focused Ethnography to Explore Professional Attitudes Regarding Neonatal Palliative Care. J Pain Symptom Manage, 47(2), 512-513. (02/2014)
  • Williams-Reade Jacqueline, Freitas Cassidy, & Lawson Lindsey. (2014). Narrative-Informed Medical Family Therapy: Using Narrative Therapy Practices in Brief Medical Encounters. Families, Systems & Health: The Journal of Collaborative Family HealthCare, 32(4), 416-425. Effective mental health practice in a medical context is a collaborative "both/and" relationship between therapists, patients, and health care team collaborators. The biomedical model that is most often used in health care is an important piece of a patient's healing, and narrative therapy brings an excellent patient and family centered addition to this framework. Using this model, behavioral health therapists can help patients understand how their experiences of illness may be shaped by larger social discourses and how they may then choose which of these messages about illness fit for them and which do not. Narrative therapy additionally facilitates the goals of medical family therapy (agency and communion) through engaging patients as experts in their own illness experience and facilitating a sense of control over the different ways that they choose to draw on support and cope with their illness-related challenges. In this article, we discuss the benefits of using narrative therapy in brief behavioral health encounters within medical settings and include implications for behavioral health practitioners interested in using this modality to better meet the needs of patients and families. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Families, Systems & Health: The Journal of Collaborative Family HealthCare is the property of American Psychological Association and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.) (2014) (link)
  • Distelberg Brian, Williams-Reade Jackie, Tapanes Daniel, Montgomery Susanne, & Pandit Mayuri. (2014). Evaluation of a Family Systems Intervention for Managing Pediatric Chronic Illness: Mastering Each New Direction ( MEND). Fam Process, 53(2), 194-213. Family systems play a crucial, albeit complex, role in pediatric chronic illness. Unfortunately, very few psychosocial interventions are available to help these stressed families navigate the developmental steps of chronic illness. A new intervention ( MEND) addresses the needs of these families and applies to a broad range of chronic illnesses. This article presents this family systems intervention as well as includes preliminary program evaluation data on 22 families that graduated from the program. Results show consistently strong effects across an array of psychosocial measures. Conclusions from this preliminary study suggest that families entering MEND present with high levels of stress due to the child's chronic illness, but after MEND, the level of stress and other functioning measures are comparable to those seen in healthy families, suggesting that the program offers a significant benefit to families with pediatric chronic illness. (English) [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Los sistemas familiares desempeñan un papel fundamental, aunque complejo, en las enfermedades pediátricas crónicas. Desafortunadamente, existen muy pocas intervenciones psicosociales para ayudar a estas familias estresadas a atravesar las etapas de desarrollo de una enfermedad crónica. Una nueva intervención ( MEND) aborda las necesidades de estas familias y se aplica a una amplia variedad de enfermedades crónicas. Este artículo presenta esta intervención de sistemas familiares y también incluye datos de la evaluación del programa preliminar sobre 22 familias que se graduaron de dicho programa. Los resultados indican sistemáticamente efectos convincentes entre una variedad de aspectos psicosociales. Las conclusiones de este estudio preliminar sugieren que las familias que ingresan en la intervención MEND presentan niveles elevados de estrés debido a la enfermedad crónica de su niño, pero que después de la MEND, el nivel de estrés y de otras medidas de desempeño son comparables a los que se observan en las familias sanas, lo cual indica que el programa ofrece un beneficio importante a las familias con enfermedades pediátricas crónicas. (Spanish) [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] 家庭系ç»?å?¨å?¿ç«¥æ?¢æ?§ç?¾ç??中起ç??è?½ç?¶å¤?æ??ä½?å?´å?³é?®ç??ä½?ç?¨ã??å?¯æ??,æ??å°?æ??å¿?ç??å¹²é¢?æ?¥å¸®å?©è¿?äº?饱å??å??å??ç??家庭走è¿?æ?¢æ?§ç?¾ç??ç??å??å??å±?步骤ã??æ?°ç??å¹²é¢?æ?¹æ³? ( MEND) å??é??对è¿?äº?家庭ç??é??æ±?,å?¯åº?ç?¨äº?广è??å?´ç??æ?¢æ?§ç?¾ç??ã??æ?¬æ??ä»?ç»?äº?è¿?ç§?家庭系ç»?å¹²é¢?æ³?,å??æ?¬å¯¹å??ä¸?项ç?®ç??22个家庭ç??å??步项ç?®è¯?ä¼°æ?°æ?®ã??ç ?究ç»?æ??æ?¾ç¤ºäº?è¿?ç§?æ?¹æ³?å?¨å??ç§?å¿?ç??社ä¼?é??表ä¸?ç??è¿?贯强æ??ã??è¿?ä¸?å??æ­¥ç ?究ç»?æ??表æ??,è¿?å?¥ MEND项ç?®ç??家庭å? ä¸ºå­©å­?ç??æ?¢æ?§ç?¾ç??å??ç?°å?ºé«?æ°´å¹³å??å??,ä½?å?¨ç»?è¿? MEND项ç?®å¹²é¢?å??,å??å??å?¼å??å?¶å®?å??è?½æµ?é??ä¸?å?¥åº·å®¶åº­æ??å??ç?°ç??ç?¸å½?,è¿?表æ??项ç?®ç»?å?¿ç«¥æ?¢æ?§ç?¾ç??家庭带æ?¥é??è¦?ç??å¤?ã?? (Chinese) [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Family Process is the property of Wiley-Blackwell and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.) (2014) (link)
  • Williams-Reade J, Lamson A L, Knight S M, White M B, Ballard S M, & Desai P P. (2013). The clinical, operational, and financial worlds of neonatal palliative care: A focused ethnography. Palliat Support Care, , 1-8. (10/2013) (link)
  • Williams-Reade J, Lamson A L, Knight S M, White M B, Ballard S M, & Desai P P. (2013). Paediatric palliative care: a review of needs, obstacles and the future. J Nurs Manag, , . (08/2013) (link)
  • Williams Reade, J., White, M.B., White, C. and Russell, C. (2012). “Stress, Perceived Support, and Effects on Coping for Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis.” Journal of Clinical Neuroscience, 44(1), 54–63. (02/2012) (link)

Online Publications

Non-Scholarly Journals

  • “Medical Family Therapy: A Brief Introduction.” AAMFT-CA Division Newsletter, Spring edition. (05/2014)
  • “Reality, Hope, and Denial.” Collaborative Family Healthcare Association (CFHA) - Growing MedFT Blog. (05/2012)
  • “Medical Family Therapy Musings: Holding onto Hope in the Midst of a Serious Illness.” American Association for Marital and Family Therapy - Mid-Atlantic Division Newsletter, Spring. (05/2012)
  • “What Brought Me Here?: Self-Of-(Medical Family) Therapist Exploration.”Collaborative Family Healthcare Association (CFHA) - Growing MedFT Blog. (02/2012)
  • “Self-Exploration in the Healthcare Field.” Johns Hopkins University, Berman Institute of Bioethics, Bioethics Bulletin, February. (02/2012)
  • “Medical Family Therapy: Assessing for the Impact of Illness, Injury, and Disability.” American Association for Marital and Family Therapy - Mid-Atlantic Division Newsletter, Winter. (01/2012)
  • “Medical Family Therapy: A Brief Introduction.” American Association for Marital and Family Therapy - Mid-Atlantic Division Newsletter, Fall. (10/2011)